Squarepusher Interview

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Lata:
01.03.04
  INTERVIEW FROM ID MAGAZINE 
 Taken from Warp Records

Squarepusher Interview from i-D Magazine, March 2004.


Do you feel that Ultravisitor is your best work to date...it feels like a fairly epic, very personal odyssey. Did you need to throw a hell of a lot of emotion into it...?
Ultravisitor is my spectacle of beauty and of terror. It is unknowable, and will never be understood by anybody, least of all its creator. It brings all the problematic figures to my mind that I have loved endlessly and yet remain as unknown to me as the first time I came across them (though I in no way associate my work with them, lest their reputation be affected.) Andrei, Franz, Don, Hermann, Richard, Friedrich, Sebastien, David, Tod, Augustus.



Do you have any kind've vision/plan prior to producing...it seems more like an intense, out of control stream of consciousness...?
I have only ever had one idea, and that is to be myself. That is the only thing I can do, in my work and in my life in general. That is not to say that my work is a representation of what I am. It is only a game for which I'm guessing the rules. I do not want to give myself away, so I play games instead. You see my work as personal, but it is anything but that. It has very little to do with me, and that is why it is and will remain intrueging.
Through it you will sense my shadow, but never myself. In contrast look at say Ninja Tune for example. All of their work drips with earnestness and tries to be quirky or have "personality". A radical mistake that ensures noone will care about it in the future - the exposed truth of personalities is so completely boring.



Were parts of Ultravisitor recorded on tour?
Yes, in fact most of the tracks are recorded from shows either in the UK or in the US/Canada. The point of using live versions of the tracks is that they show stupid people that, though their own stubbornness prevents them from being able to engage with my music, they hear other people cheering in the background, and realise that although this music is obscure, it cannot be totally inaccessible because other people like it. Because it is obscure, but not totally inaccessible, this makes it cool. This makes stupid people buy it. One day their children will dust it off and play it, and realise that I am the supreme musical genius of my generation. This means I'll still be able to play gigs when I'm an old fart with no ideas. Hopefully.



What do you perceive as avant-garde music today..?
There is really no such thing as a musical avant-garde, because enough people are now so ready and desperate for "difference" that nothing experimental stays on the margins. The speed at which information can be disseminated about music forces anybody with something resembling originality to be quickly brought to the zenith of their popularity. Thus their career is prematurely terminated, or more accurately, frozen. Hence the search goes on. Anything now is acceptable, such is the need for novelty. It has revealed that there was never taste, just habits. Now there are only waves of enthusiasm that break and sink into the sand, in endless procession.
 

7 below:
Quote

This makes stupid people buy it. One day their children will dust it off and play it, and realise that I am the supreme musical genius of my generation. This means I'll still be able to play gigs when I'm an old fart with no ideas. Hopefully.

ARF!

Throwing Snow:
ninja tunes got a bit of a rinsing!!

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