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Sound Proofing.

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Ölie von Goochunberg
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« on: February 16, 2012, 19:11:39 »

I have just set up my gear in a new house, but I want to be considerate to the family next door and would like to soundproof the room as much as possible.
What is the best cheap option, and will I need to sound proof every wall or just the wall connecting to my neighbours house?
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« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2012, 21:46:41 »

Stopping transmission is very difficult. If you live in an old house built of sturdy brick with an air gap in between the party walls then it should be fairly well isolated already. You'll struggle to improve it without building a room-in-room, which is expensive and not practical in a rented place. Those panels you stick on walls change the acoustic properties inside your room but really don't do much in terms of stopping transmission,
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« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2012, 01:16:08 »

We just used egg boxes and rags for our car boot.

Worked a treat.
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« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2012, 17:47:59 »

I was wondering this actually. Probably start converting the loft next year to a bedroom/ studio for the girlfriend and I to hide from the kiddies. Need it soundproofed quite well to stop their inccesant nagging being picked up by the large condensers  Grin
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« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2012, 18:38:43 »

If you're converting a loft then the best way to go is room-in-room mounted on isolating pads and de-coupled from the walls it is pinned to using proper acoustic tie-backs, with the interior done in acoustic plasterboard. You'll lose about 6-8 inches off each dimension of the room, the more the better (larger air gap). Also double-lining it with acoustic plasterboard can help a lot.
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« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2012, 18:41:06 »

If you're converting a loft then the best way to go is room-in-room mounted on isolating pads and de-coupled from the walls it is pinned to using proper acoustic tie-backs, with the interior done in acoustic plasterboard. You'll lose about 6-8 inches off each dimension of the room, the more the better (larger air gap). Also double-lining it with acoustic plasterboard can help a lot.
Cheers dude.  Two Thumbs
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« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2012, 18:50:55 »

Thick carpet (or proper acoustic carpet) is good too, but not really necessary if you're trying to save pennies (the carpet stops footfall sound from escaping into the room below, rather than stopping sound from getting in from below)

edit: Also, gaps are the enemy. Boxing your vents properly and doubling up the door/hatch are really useful techniques as even the smallest gap allowing direct airflow will negate any advantage of the room-in-room.
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« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2012, 13:21:49 »


Snoo, have a read through that. There are probably other threads about conversions. Don't forget to check whther you need planning permission or building regs signed off.

http://www.soundonsound.com/forum/showflat.php?Cat=&Board=DESIGN&Number=850968
http://www.soundonsound.com/forum/showflat.php?Cat=&Board=DESIGN&Number=716986

Ollie, might be worth reading up on this http://www.greengluecompany.com/ but I presume you are renting, so it might not be practical to do much soundproofing. Try to decouple your speakers as best you can, on stands, but otherwise, invest in some nice headphones, if the walls aren't great.
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« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2012, 12:47:50 »


Snoo, have a read through that. There are probably other threads about conversions. Don't forget to check whther you need planning permission or building regs signed off.

http://www.soundonsound.com/forum/showflat.php?Cat=&Board=DESIGN&Number=850968
http://www.soundonsound.com/forum/showflat.php?Cat=&Board=DESIGN&Number=716986

Cheers dude. Luckily we have a nice big loft space without the need to expand the roof line, so no planning regs required now that they've relaxed the laws.
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« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2012, 19:17:19 »

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« Reply #10 on: March 03, 2012, 10:08:33 »

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« Reply #11 on: March 16, 2012, 01:16:36 »

Build some acoustic absorber panels out of rockwool RWA45, there's loads of guides on the internet - won't absorb all the bass but it will definitely help.
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« Reply #12 on: March 16, 2012, 09:15:15 »

Build some acoustic absorber panels out of rockwool RWA45, there's loads of guides on the internet - won't absorb all the bass but it will definitely help.

It won’t stop sound transferring through the walls. If anything it'll potentially make it worse as the absorption will mean higher monitoring levels are required. The best way to prevent sound transmission is through de-coupling; ideally a room within a room or providing an air gap.

For bass traps you are better off with RW60 used in a double layer.
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« Reply #13 on: March 19, 2012, 06:09:05 »

Build some acoustic absorber panels out of rockwool RWA45, there's loads of guides on the internet - won't absorb all the bass but it will definitely help.

It won’t stop sound transferring through the walls. If anything it'll potentially make it worse as the absorption will mean higher monitoring levels are required. The best way to prevent sound transmission is through de-coupling; ideally a room within a room or providing an air gap.

For bass traps you are better off with RW60 used in a double layer.


Of course it won't make it worse, lower monitoring levels are needed as you aren't hearing all the reflections, you need lower volume as you have increased clarity.

4 inches of RWA45 mounted on a frame to create a 2 inch trap behind it, and then hung 2 inches off the wall will definitely help, and will only cost about 40 quid for six 2 by 4 foot panels. RWA60 if you want bass traps only as it will reflect more of the higher frequencies.

It'll sound better in there, you won't have to tear down your wall and inject it with foam or build a room within a room, and it will help transmission a bit, worth doing.
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« Reply #14 on: March 19, 2012, 09:06:02 »

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/dec07/articles/acoustics.htm

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It is very important to understand that acoustic treatment is not the same thing as soundproofing — a common misconception amongst the uninitiated. We can look into that another time but, as a general rule, the things you do to improve the listening accuracy of a room usually have negligible effect on the amount of sound that leaks into or out of that room. Indeed, an acoustically treated room may sound 'quieter' for a given monitor speaker level than an untreated room, and this could lead you to turn up the volume, so the sound leakage problem actually gets worse!



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« Reply #15 on: March 19, 2012, 09:21:41 »

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/dec07/articles/acoustics.htm

Quote
It is very important to understand that acoustic treatment is not the same thing as soundproofing — a common misconception amongst the uninitiated. We can look into that another time but, as a general rule, the things you do to improve the listening accuracy of a room usually have negligible effect on the amount of sound that leaks into or out of that room. Indeed, an acoustically treated room may sound 'quieter' for a given monitor speaker level than an untreated room, and this could lead you to turn up the volume, so the sound leakage problem actually gets worse!

highly unlikely that you'll introduce more dead zones than you started with by treating your room


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« Reply #16 on: March 19, 2012, 10:20:07 »

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/dec07/articles/acoustics.htm

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It is very important to understand that acoustic treatment is not the same thing as soundproofing — a common misconception amongst the uninitiated. We can look into that another time but, as a general rule, the things you do to improve the listening accuracy of a room usually have negligible effect on the amount of sound that leaks into or out of that room. Indeed, an acoustically treated room may sound 'quieter' for a given monitor speaker level than an untreated room, and this could lead you to turn up the volume, so the sound leakage problem actually gets worse!

highly unlikely that you'll introduce more dead zones than you started with by treating your room



If you treat a room with absorptive materials then your very aim is to deaden. Absorbing where previously there was air gap will obviously reduce transmission and will also slightly increase reflection (as any material is more reflective than an air gap). But if you treat an already reflective area with absorptive material you will lower the intensity of absorbed frequencies in the monitoring zone, making it sound quieter at those frequencies.

Acoustic treatment is for shaping the sound in a room and one generally sets out to do this subtractively, by identifying modes in the room which colour the sound at certain frequencies then introducing deadening materials to the incidence points of those modes. This reduces the volume of the resonant frequencies of those modes. Its the whole point of what you're doing, and shouldn't ought to affect transmission hardly at all.
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« Reply #17 on: March 19, 2012, 11:14:01 »


If you treat a room with absorptive materials then your very aim is to deaden.

By dead zones I mean ares of the frequency spectrum you are cancelling out.
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« Reply #18 on: March 19, 2012, 12:59:49 »

http://www.noisehelp.com/how-to-soundproof.html

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There are a whole host of materials that claim to be good for soundproofing, at prices all over the map. Then your brother-in-law tells you to forget all those fancy, pricey products; all you need is to hang some carpet on the walls, or some egg cartons, and maybe some heavy drapes over the windows....

The reality is that soundproofing isn't a simple topic, and there is a lot of misinformation floating around, but it's not a black art either. There are just a few key soundproofing principles, and all materials and techniques that are effective accomplish their task using one or more of these principles, which are solidly based on the physics of sound transmission.

First, let's clear up one very common point of confusion. Sound absorption is not the same as sound blocking. Absorption is indeed one of the elements of soundproofing, but it actually contributes only a minor effect. Most materials with sound-absorbing properties are intended to improve the acoustics of a room, not to prevent sound from coming in or going out. They reduce reverberation and echoing of sound already present in the room, but they do not block sound from entering or leaving. So a product having excellent sound absorption is not necessarily useful for soundproofing. If you're looking for effective soundproofing, don't spend your time looking at products that are designed for acoustical room treatment.

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« Reply #19 on: April 04, 2012, 14:42:41 »

If you're converting a loft then the best way to go is room-in-room mounted on isolating pads and de-coupled from the walls it is pinned to using proper acoustic tie-backs, with the interior done in acoustic plasterboard. You'll lose about 6-8 inches off each dimension of the room, the more the better (larger air gap). Also double-lining it with acoustic plasterboard can help a lot.

Building legislation now requires that all loft rooms must have a 4 foot gap between the room and adjoining wall to your neighbours, and this works an absolute treat in mine, I have a meaty set up consisting of some hench monitors aswell as a beefy stereo hooked up quadraphonic and my neighbours have never heard a squeak!
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