HIJACK
July 02, 2022, 05:57:07 *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
Main Forum.Faces Gallery.Tunes and Mixes.The Desk
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Share this page
Pages: [1] |   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic:

best headphones for producing?

 (Read 26222 times)
Jameee
Raver
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 327



View Profile View Faces Gallery WWW

Ignore
« on: January 09, 2010, 13:14:52 »

hello all
im sure this topic exists here already but i dont have time to search for it, what with having the mafia on my ass all the time
so can you tell me the best/your favourite headphones for producing electronic music?
il be making dubstep/ garage kinda stuff
and i can spend about 1 hundred pounds
thank you very much  OMG Death Star!!!11
Logged

Snoo
Dub Specialist
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4,351


Original Choker


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2010, 13:58:27 »

Buy some proper monitors.
Logged

http://silentspring.bandcamp.com/

Home Fucking Is Killing Prostitution.
x
Knife of the Realm
******
Offline

Posts: 13,197


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2010, 14:26:11 »

Yes producing on headphones is for people who don't want to be able to hear anything next year.

edit: and who also want to make records that aren't in proper stereo.
Logged
Richard_Gale
Raver
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 269


UnderWater Crew


View Profile View Faces Gallery WWW

Ignore
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2010, 23:15:47 »

senny hd25.  nothing better.  good reference for dj mixing.  good reference for sound mixers in tv, resilient.  really good for fine tuning the kick and bass volumes.  just double check your snares arent too harsh because they have a habit of softening a harsh snare.

fact is, i think a pair of headphones are great for mixing down a track (with assisted occasional checking on speakers)

mastering and taking care of those niggling bits that downt sit well in a mix is often tricky, but not impossible on hd25's.
Logged

Richard_Gale
Raver
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 269


UnderWater Crew


View Profile View Faces Gallery WWW

Ignore
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2010, 23:19:00 »

ps. 

'proper monitors' will cost at least £1000.  and even then will not provide accurate lf response down to below 50/60hz.

some hd25's will give you accurate response down to however low you wanna go.  dubstep on a pair of krk6 inchers isnt gonna be very easy to deal with your low frequencies.
Logged

[sic] / Powdermonkey
Ultimate Warrior
******
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 5,214


Balls Deep in music...


View Profile View Faces Gallery WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2010, 23:38:17 »

senny hd25.  nothing better.  good reference for dj mixing.  good reference for sound mixers in tv, resilient.  really good for fine tuning the kick and bass volumes.  just double check your snares arent too harsh because they have a habit of softening a harsh snare.

fact is, i think a pair of headphones are great for mixing down a track (with assisted occasional checking on speakers)

mastering and taking care of those niggling bits that downt sit well in a mix is often tricky, but not impossible on hd25's.
ps. 

'proper monitors' will cost at least £1000.  and even then will not provide accurate lf response down to below 50/60hz.

some hd25's will give you accurate response down to however low you wanna go.  dubstep on a pair of krk6 inchers isnt gonna be very easy to deal with your low frequencies.

This basically.

I use the HD25s for referencing when mixing and it brings out aspects that I just can't hear in the room, and that's using £700 quids worth of monitors. And it's not necessarily the monitors, it's room and reflection.

Try and get the soft ear pads too - so much more comfy! Smiley
Logged
x
Knife of the Realm
******
Offline

Posts: 13,197


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2010, 00:46:45 »

Sigh. Mix on speakers, check in headphones. You need the best speakers possible. They are very important. And even shitty hi-fi speakers are better than headphones because headphones are not stereophonic. You can't make a stereo record on a pair of headphones. Plus headphones are bad for your hearing.
Logged
Jameee
Raver
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 327



View Profile View Faces Gallery WWW

Ignore
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2010, 03:12:47 »

maybe i should of said
i want em for
1 general ipod listening to and 2 taking to college to use. cos you cant have 20 people in a room all using speakers can you, that would just be silly.
im thinking of maybe getting these.
http://www.dv247.com/headphones/akg-k-141-mk-ii-stereo-studio-headphones--51667
 anybody know how they compare to the 25's? or anything to say about em at all? reviews seem good
Logged

Richard_Gale
Raver
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 269


UnderWater Crew


View Profile View Faces Gallery WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2010, 21:06:14 »

i find specific 'studio' headphones like those akg's miss the point a bit.  they dont ever give a realistic impression of how a mix will sound on anything else.  they sound different to everything else.  whereas, so many dj's mix using hd25's.  you get to learn the headphones inside out due to them being usable on ipods, djing, studio, etc.  akg's will look very strange on the train or bus.  on the flipside, whack them on a singer and they will come alive on a recording session and work way better than some hd25's

if a track sounds good on senny hd25's itll sound good anywhere - fact.

el noodle- how the can a pair of headphones be less stereophonic than a pair of speakers?  if anything you get a better stereo image and idea of balance between your pans.  as long as you double check using speakers, and mono your Lf bandwidth you gonna be fine using headphones.  id say a pair of shitty ipod earbuds would be better to mix on than a pair of aiwa midi speakers. 

id even go as far as to say id challenge you to try mixing down a track on some hifi speakers against the same miixdown done by myself using hd25's.  first hurdle you will meet is not having enough dynamic range in hifi speakers to deal with correctly eqing and compressing a kick to sit in a mix for example.   second, the probable dip between 500hz and 3khz on cheap hifi speakers will not give an accurate representation of your midband tonal balance or prominant middy percussions.  third, eventually he will realise this and have to adjust out of the bad habits he learn while using shitty hifi speakers.

go into a music production college course with hd25's and the geeks/tutors will say you bought unwisely and that you need akg's.  then when they realise your mixes are more accurate than theirs they will realise they fell for the clever marketing of the budget studio headphones, and the advice of tutors with none of their own successful releases.   
Logged

x
Knife of the Realm
******
Offline

Posts: 13,197


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2010, 22:44:41 »

Due respect sir but you are wrong. Headphones give a "false stereo" image. You know that thing where one tiny bit of a record is hard-panned left and it makes you feel deaf in the right? Thats a good demonstration of the issue. Something balanced on headphones invariably ends up using less width than something balanced on properly positioned speakers. You can do fantastic binaural stuff on headphones, but it needs to be played back on headphones. Headphones for stereo are perfect for listening, because a properly made record will have been checked to make sure it works in both mono and false stereo. But you can't make a record properly unless you mix it in speakers and then check it on headphones (as well as checking it in the car, on the iPod, on the living room hi-fi and wherever else possible).

edit: re the studio headphones, which by the way are BeyerDynamic DTs by standard not AKGs. They're not intended for mixing on. They're the studio standard for monitoring, purely because they are rugged and every part is replaceable. This means that when the entire band drop them on the floor in the live room, and then stand on them on the way back from lunch, they don't turn into a huge money sink for the studio.

another edit: in somewhere like college where using headphones is neccessary then a good, comfortable set at a reaonable volume for no more than an hour at a time would indeed be the 25s. But really only cos you have to, and cos you're there to practice not to make a professional release.
Logged
Mash
Raver
***
Offline

Posts: 221


It's Miniature Slovenian Hay-Rack time


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #10 on: January 12, 2010, 17:04:40 »

For that sort of dosh cans will be a safe bet to get you started.  Usual suspects apply; AKG K702/K701, Sennheiser HD650/HD600 etc. and as already stated, you could do far worse than the trusty HD25-1 II Pro's.  With a bit of shopping about you should hopefully find something suitable near your budget.  Proper monitoring doesn't come cheap and comparing to headphones outright is a bit futile imo.  A workhorse monitoring setup is going to be well into five figures, budget setup around £2.5k, starter system about £1k.  Of course 'monitoring' on cans is going to involve compromise; mixing reverb levels too wet, judging low end levels, panning (a bit of crossfeed can help here) and other spatial anomalies being some of the more obvious issues, but conversely if you're writing dance music it's important your music sounds good for the iPod crew who I'm guessing make up a fair chunk of your audience.  Apart from that usual common sense applies, reference on as many other sound systems as possible with well mixed references to get a feel how your headphone mixes translate, keep tweaking, and enjoy pushing on with your music!

HTH!

Mash Smiley
Logged

x
Knife of the Realm
******
Offline

Posts: 13,197


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #11 on: January 12, 2010, 17:07:14 »

You don't need to spaff £1k on a basic monitoring setup. All you need is a set of decent active nearfields. I know a happy little pair that you can get for under £300 that as far as I'm concerned shit on everything else you can get that costs less than £1500 a pair.

edit: And I'm still jealous of what you do for a living you jammy bastard.  Bad Teeth
Logged
Mash
Raver
***
Offline

Posts: 221


It's Miniature Slovenian Hay-Rack time


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #12 on: January 12, 2010, 17:32:44 »

Well at least the theatre full of film makers/composers at Leicester Square Odeon seemed pretty keen for my opinion when I spoke there this weekend about my work at Abbey Road Wink

And can you and your god awful MSP5' s PLEASE get a room!! Perv, mmmhmmm, yummy *rubs hands*

Mash Cool
Logged

Block Party
Knife of the Realm
******
Offline

Posts: 10,722


Bristol crew!


View Profile View Faces Gallery WWW

Ignore
« Reply #13 on: January 12, 2010, 17:55:32 »

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/apr08/articles/qa0408_4.htm
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jan07/articles/mixingheadphones.htm
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/feb06/articles/qa0206_5.htm
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/dec03/articles/mixingheadphones.htm

Articles about mixing on phones versus monitors
Logged

x
Knife of the Realm
******
Offline

Posts: 13,197


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2010, 18:18:45 »

Well at least the theatre full of film makers/composers at Leicester Square Odeon seemed pretty keen for my opinion when I spoke there this weekend about my work at Abbey Road Wink

And can you and your god awful MSP5' s PLEASE get a room!! Perv, mmmhmmm, yummy *rubs hands*

Mash Cool

OK so now I'm still jealous but I just don't like you, you pompous git.
Logged
Siege
Raver
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 237



View Profile View Faces Gallery WWW

Ignore
« Reply #15 on: January 13, 2010, 23:21:38 »

There was a good roundup in the January issue of "Sound On Sound" about this very subject. Its still in the shops.
The general rule seemed to be the more expensive the better (obviously?) but there isn't a great deal of difference (i.e. subtle and to personal taste) when you get to the Sennheiser HD650s and BeyerDynamic DT880s then after that its diminishing returns when it comes to cost to quality (i.e. the £1000 Sennheiser HD800s).

I've been using the Sennheiser HD580 for the last 6 or 7 years, which are an oooooold version of the HD600/650. I've decided to retire them and i've just placed an order for the HD650s (as im used to the brand), my phones are getting a bit long in the tooth now and there is much better out there these days.

I personally have tried a friends pair of the BeyerDynamic 770 phones which had a more extended and crisp sound than my old HD580s and you can pick them up for about £125, bargain. I think they got Mid price all rounder award in Sound on Sound but for a bit more you can get the 880 Pros for about £200.

Logged

TJS
Rookie
**
Offline

Posts: 51


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #16 on: January 14, 2010, 12:35:48 »

I have been thinking about getting some headphones myself recently and stumbled accross this thread

http://www.dogsonacid.com/showthread.php?threadid=603103&highlight=headphones

Although by the time I reached page 7 I kinda decided maybe I can't be bothered to get headphones..... Undecided

@ teh noodlé you can still acheive a decent mix if you have a decent pair of headphones. Particulary if your room has terrible acoustics for mixing / you have shitty speakers.
Logged
Block Party
Knife of the Realm
******
Offline

Posts: 10,722


Bristol crew!


View Profile View Faces Gallery WWW

Ignore
« Reply #17 on: January 14, 2010, 13:04:42 »

I have been thinking about getting some headphones myself recently and stumbled accross this thread

http://www.dogsonacid.com/showthread.php?threadid=603103&highlight=headphones

Although by the time I reached page 7 I kinda decided maybe I can't be bothered to get headphones..... Undecided

@ teh noodlé you can still acheive a decent mix if you have a decent pair of headphones. Particulary if your room has terrible acoustics for mixing / you have shitty speakers.

I like to read the last sentence as "teh noodlé you have shitty speakers."  Bad Teeth I can't talk, my monitors are pretty low quality, but are on the list for upgrading soon.
Logged

x
Knife of the Realm
******
Offline

Posts: 13,197


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #18 on: January 14, 2010, 13:11:02 »

I've been quite curt in this thread, maybe I should explain my position.

I started off when I was 15 with what I could afford; hi-fi speakers from an old hi-fi I got in Tandy, which had the foil tweeters depressed by my idiot friend and a wedge cut out the woofer with a stanley knife by my idiot self. I spent a good 7 years using first those pieces of crap then some slightly better jamo pieces of bookshelf speaker crap I salvaged from a bar. I learned a fuck load, and its true that for learning from scratch it doesn't really matter what you use.

I did all my checking on ATCs, Fostex nearfields and Gennys at uni in the later 3 of those 7 years. I also spent a year working somewhere that had NS10s, Gennys and custom room monitors. I started to get to know my jamo hi-fi speakers well enough to do a solid mix on them, but ONLY because I'd regularly compared my results to high quality monitors and I knew the response of my jamos well enough to at least get level and balance right. The same also goes for position and room acoustic; if you know your room, and you compare your mix results in a proper room, then you will naturally find yourself making adjustments just because you know your kit and how it responds. But it all hinges on having a high-quality reference to compare it to.

In my opinion a similar principle applies to headphones, when used for stereo balancing; if you have a lot of experience of making mixes on speakers then comparing them to headphones, you will inevitably learn how a  mix should sound in headphones in order to achieve a certain effect on stereo speakers. If, however, you've only ever used headphones and you've never actually sat down and mixed on at least some decent properly positioned bookshelf speakers then you have no frame of reference and its unlikely that any balancing you do in cans is going to come across as intended on speakers.
Logged
Richard_Gale
Raver
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 269


UnderWater Crew


View Profile View Faces Gallery WWW

Ignore
« Reply #19 on: January 15, 2010, 01:31:45 »

I've been quite curt in this thread, maybe I should explain my position.

I started off when I was 15 with what I could afford; hi-fi speakers from an old hi-fi I got in Tandy, which had the foil tweeters depressed by my idiot friend and a wedge cut out the woofer with a stanley knife by my idiot self. I spent a good 7 years using first those pieces of crap then some slightly better jamo pieces of bookshelf speaker crap I salvaged from a bar. I learned a fuck load, and its true that for learning from scratch it doesn't really matter what you use.

I did all my checking on ATCs, Fostex nearfields and Gennys at uni in the later 3 of those 7 years. I also spent a year working somewhere that had NS10s, Gennys and custom room monitors. I started to get to know my jamo hi-fi speakers well enough to do a solid mix on them, but ONLY because I'd regularly compared my results to high quality monitors and I knew the response of my jamos well enough to at least get level and balance right. The same also goes for position and room acoustic; if you know your room, and you compare your mix results in a proper room, then you will naturally find yourself making adjustments just because you know your kit and how it responds. But it all hinges on having a high-quality reference to compare it to.

In my opinion a similar principle applies to headphones, when used for stereo balancing; if you have a lot of experience of making mixes on speakers then comparing them to headphones, you will inevitably learn how a  mix should sound in headphones in order to achieve a certain effect on stereo speakers. If, however, you've only ever used headphones and you've never actually sat down and mixed on at least some decent properly positioned bookshelf speakers then you have no frame of reference and its unlikely that any balancing you do in cans is going to come across as intended on speakers.

My counter argument(though i understand that headphones can't replicate how a piece of music will sound within a physical space, or how the  l/r information will work within a space):

(assuming you are in the edm field where LF is very important)
Unless you have minimum of 1000 english pounds to spend on a pair of quested s8's (or similar) you have absolutely no idea what is going on below 60hz.  the s8's have a f3 of 50hz, with the wind behind them in a perfect (small)room.  smaller models such as the ns10's or the newer yamahas, krk 6's, alesis, etc roll off at between 80 and 100hz, with terrible group delay(due to tuning of a very small cabinet in order to acheive the lowest possible f3) - meaning accurate timing of kick to snare etc goes straight out of the window.

To me, the stereo argument is null and void when you take into consideration the unobstructed LF response of a good headphone and the ability to crank a mix to really see a difference when compressing a kickdrum for example.

If this were an argument against headphones when the other option were the PMC system in NRK/Optimum Mastering then the true flat response down to 30-40hz and low group delay of the speakers, and their treated room, I would favour the speakers.  The argument isnt as strong when problem factors such as what i mention are taken into consideration.

My point is that if you give someone a budget of 500quid, they will be producing better mixes, quicker and more efficiently using headphones costing 100quid, than if they were mixing on 500quids worth of budget monitors.  Even if they mix in mono - which most club systems are anyway (again, assuming the musician is making edm)   
Logged

x
Knife of the Realm
******
Offline

Posts: 13,197


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #20 on: January 15, 2010, 07:25:00 »

I get by just fine with my monitors. I find it easier to reference the lowest 20Hz in the record on my halfway-decent consumer system, safe in the knowledge that I'm dealing with the other couple of tens of thousands of hertz properly on some halfway-decent speakers. I suppose we should agree to disagree. At the end of the day you can't argue with the results from either side of the fence. Only thing is I probably can't do what you do in 'phones, and you probably can't do what I do with "shit" monitors.Its what you're used to and what you like at the end of the day (altho I of course still think I'm right).
Logged
Snoo
Dub Specialist
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4,351


Original Choker


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #21 on: January 15, 2010, 13:22:51 »

Clearly you need these.....
http://blog.logitech.com/2010/01/14/born-today-for-music-royalty-the-ultimate-ears-18-pro/
Logged

http://silentspring.bandcamp.com/

Home Fucking Is Killing Prostitution.
Wascal
Veteran
****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2,727


wub. tssssh...


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #22 on: January 19, 2010, 08:57:35 »

I can't recomend Beyerdynamic DT990 Pro's highly enough, amazing sound quality and comfort  Two Thumbs
Logged

Snoo
Dub Specialist
*****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4,351


Original Choker


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #23 on: January 26, 2010, 21:25:14 »



I did all my checking on ATCs,
I had a tour of their factory once. Their speakers are built and tested in a barn with some tractors in the corner! They raise the speakers up for test and check the frequency response, then when they view the bode plots they ignore some of the readings due to the interactions with the barn. Top blokes in there, mind. I had a great day which ended in listening to Dark Side Of The Moon on Nick Masons amp & speakers which were in for a service.
Logged

http://silentspring.bandcamp.com/

Home Fucking Is Killing Prostitution.
El Kid (previously B-LAM)
Veteran
****
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1,173

SURESKANK


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #24 on: February 21, 2010, 12:38:20 »

Due respect sir but you are wrong. Headphones give a "false stereo" image. You know that thing where one tiny bit of a record is hard-panned left and it makes you feel deaf in the right? Thats a good demonstration of the issue. Something balanced on headphones invariably ends up using less width than something balanced on properly positioned speakers. You can do fantastic binaural stuff on headphones, but it needs to be played back on headphones. Headphones for stereo are perfect for listening, because a properly made record will have been checked to make sure it works in both mono and false stereo. But you can't make a record properly unless you mix it in speakers and then check it on headphones (as well as checking it in the car, on the iPod, on the living room hi-fi and wherever else possible).

edit: re the studio headphones, which by the way are BeyerDynamic DTs by standard not AKGs. They're not intended for mixing on. They're the studio standard for monitoring, purely because they are rugged and every part is replaceable. This means that when the entire band drop them on the floor in the live room, and then stand on them on the way back from lunch, they don't turn into a huge money sink for the studio.

another edit: in somewhere like college where using headphones is neccessary then a good, comfortable set at a reaonable volume for no more than an hour at a time would indeed be the 25s. But really only cos you have to, and cos you're there to practice not to make a professional release.

canz 3d
Logged

Daeronb
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #25 on: October 12, 2010, 00:34:02 »

I have somewhat different question, but still in this domain i think:
Im planning on getting headphones to produce with on the road (which will be alot). Ill be using a laptop and im think of buying hd650's or beyer 990. However, ive been reading about the need of amplification of these headphones. So my question: is it worth getting one of these headphones and using them on the road, or will the quality of the sound suffer too much too be able to produce anything decent. and if so, which headphones are suitable for this.
Logged
wholesale china
Newbie
*
Offline

Posts: 1



View Profile View Faces Gallery WWW

Ignore
« Reply #26 on: October 13, 2010, 09:14:46 »

cigarettes electronic
Logged

Tekton
Ultimate Warrior
******
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7,567


Its just a bit of dancing. Don't dress it up.


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #27 on: January 29, 2011, 16:51:38 »

I can't recomend Beyerdynamic DT990 Pro's highly enough, amazing sound quality and comfort  Two Thumbs

Got myself a pair of these and they are fricking lush!  Love
Logged

Whatever, its just a bit of dancing.
Manchurian
Rookie
**
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 119



View Profile View Faces Gallery WWW

Ignore
« Reply #28 on: February 09, 2011, 02:04:02 »

I can't recomend Beyerdynamic DT990 Pro's highly enough, amazing sound quality and comfort  Two Thumbs

Got myself a pair of these and they are fricking lush!  Love

Script Script Script DT 990 PROs are the shizness. I have Mackie MR8s for mixing everything, but they don't quite cover the sub bass well enough, so the DTs are great for checking this.
Logged

Ekonwilson
Newbie
*
Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1



View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #29 on: February 09, 2011, 05:07:23 »

 Any reason why people are choosing headphones over a good set of monitors?
Logged

Manchurian
Rookie
**
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 119



View Profile View Faces Gallery WWW

Ignore
« Reply #30 on: February 09, 2011, 13:30:17 »

I have somewhat different question, but still in this domain i think:
Im planning on getting headphones to produce with on the road (which will be alot). Ill be using a laptop and im think of buying hd650's or beyer 990. However, ive been reading about the need of amplification of these headphones. So my question: is it worth getting one of these headphones and using them on the road, or will the quality of the sound suffer too much too be able to produce anything decent. and if so, which headphones are suitable for this.


My DT 990s require 250ohms, so I thought I'd need an amp, but they work perfectly with my Focusrite soundcard or straight out of my laptop.
Logged

Block Party
Knife of the Realm
******
Offline

Posts: 10,722


Bristol crew!


View Profile View Faces Gallery WWW

Ignore
« Reply #31 on: February 10, 2011, 13:29:53 »

Any reason why people are choosing headphones over a good set of monitors?

Good monitors in a bad room are a false economy so to speak. Most people don't treat their rooms and will get a more reliable idea from headphones costing around £200 rather than spending £800 on a pair of decent monitors and then a further £X00 on room treatment. There may be some image issues, but you can always go between the monitors you have and the headphones. Headphonse get rid of issues such as room nodes, standing waves and reflections.

Personally I still prefer monitors, but my room definitely needs some treatment to make the most of them.
Logged

Tekton
Ultimate Warrior
******
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7,567


Its just a bit of dancing. Don't dress it up.


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #32 on: February 10, 2011, 14:15:07 »

I have somewhat different question, but still in this domain i think:
Im planning on getting headphones to produce with on the road (which will be alot). Ill be using a laptop and im think of buying hd650's or beyer 990. However, ive been reading about the need of amplification of these headphones. So my question: is it worth getting one of these headphones and using them on the road, or will the quality of the sound suffer too much too be able to produce anything decent. and if so, which headphones are suitable for this.


My DT 990s require 250ohms, so I thought I'd need an amp, but they work perfectly with my Focusrite soundcard or straight out of my laptop.

Same here,my pair are 250ohms as well and are powered nicely by my mac, my soundcard and the stack system.
Logged

Whatever, its just a bit of dancing.
Tekton
Ultimate Warrior
******
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7,567


Its just a bit of dancing. Don't dress it up.


View Profile View Faces Gallery

Ignore
« Reply #33 on: February 10, 2011, 14:15:49 »

Any reason why people are choosing headphones over a good set of monitors?

Good monitors in a bad room are a false economy so to speak. Most people don't treat their rooms and will get a more reliable idea from headphones costing around £200 rather than spending £800 on a pair of decent monitors and then a further £X00 on room treatment. There may be some image issues, but you can always go between the monitors you have and the headphones. Headphonse get rid of issues such as room nodes, standing waves and reflections.

Personally I still prefer monitors, but my room definitely needs some treatment to make the most of them.

Also the added fact you can work on music at any time without pissing off neighbours/housemates/spouses.
Logged

Whatever, its just a bit of dancing.
Block Party
Knife of the Realm
******
Offline

Posts: 10,722


Bristol crew!


View Profile View Faces Gallery WWW

Ignore
« Reply #34 on: February 10, 2011, 14:58:07 »

Any reason why people are choosing headphones over a good set of monitors?

Good monitors in a bad room are a false economy so to speak. Most people don't treat their rooms and will get a more reliable idea from headphones costing around £200 rather than spending £800 on a pair of decent monitors and then a further £X00 on room treatment. There may be some image issues, but you can always go between the monitors you have and the headphones. Headphonse get rid of issues such as room nodes, standing waves and reflections.

Personally I still prefer monitors, but my room definitely needs some treatment to make the most of them.

Also the added fact you can work on music at any time without pissing off neighbours/housemates/spouses.

Yep that is also a benefit.
Logged

drfish
Raver
***
Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 202


Dr Fish - Breaking Beats


View Profile View Faces Gallery WWW

Ignore
« Reply #35 on: February 25, 2011, 12:22:15 »

senny hd25.  nothing better.  good reference for dj mixing.  good reference for sound mixers in tv, resilient.  really good for fine tuning the kick and bass volumes.  just double check your snares arent too harsh because they have a habit of softening a harsh snare.

fact is, i think a pair of headphones are great for mixing down a track (with assisted occasional checking on speakers)

mastering and taking care of those niggling bits that downt sit well in a mix is often tricky, but not impossible on hd25's.

HD25's are great DJing headphones but they're not studio headphones at all. AKG 701's are the best auposedly

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=akg701&um=1&ie=UTF-8&cid=12999240424905031354&sa=X&ei=yZ5nTdOADYrJhAeqjLmkAw&ved=0CCoQ8wIwAA#
Logged

Neverlution Sound System
Rookie
**
Offline

Posts: 94



View Profile View Faces Gallery WWW

Ignore
« Reply #36 on: February 27, 2011, 19:10:09 »

Quote
HD25's are great DJing headphones but they're not studio headphones at all. AKG 701's are the best auposedly

I was buying studio headphones not too long ago and it came between the AKG 701's and the Senny HD600's. Which is better is highly argued across the internet and is probably down to personal preference... but I went for the HD600s cos they had a warmer colouration with a better bass response - and talk about comfy  Love
Logged

Pages: [1] |   Go Up
  Print  
 

Seeing ads here? To remove them, Log in or Register.

Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines

HIJACK is part of purplelight Media ltd
and is hosted by purplelight Hosting Services. | Privacy Policy